4

April, 2022

NYC Wage Transparency Law Has Its Limits Under NYC Guidance

By Tracey I. Levy

New guidance issued by the New York City Commission of Human Rights expounds on both the breadth, and the limitations, of the city’s new wage transparency law.  The law, which we discussed in our prior blog article, requires employers posting for a position in New York City to state in their job posting the minimum and maximum salary for the position.  This requirement is currently scheduled to take effect May 15, 2022, but there is a pending legislative proposal under consideration in the City Council to delay the effective date.

Breadth in Applicability

The wage transparency law covers employers with four or more employees or one domestic worker.  When counting “employees,” business owners, employees, interns and independent contractors must all be considered, as long as at least one of them works in New York City.  Employment agencies are also covered.  There is an exception for temp firms seeking applicants to join their pool of available workers, but the law provides that the employers who work with those temp firms must follow the new wage transparency law.

The law also extends to every form of advertisement or job posting – whether internal or external, printed or electronic, published or circulated.  And it covers any type of job – whether a new position, a promotion or a transfer.  Employers need not advertise for a position in order to hire, but if they do post or advertise in any way then the guidance states that they must comply with the law.

Limitations in Wage Information to Be Disclosed

Significantly, though, the wage transparency law is about disclosure of base pay only.  Whether defined as an hourly wage or a fixed salary, that dollar value must be disclosed.  The guidance makes clear that employers are not required to disclose, for example, either in specific or general terms, any bonuses, commissions, tips, stock, overtime pay, or other forms of compensation that may apply to the position.  Compensation structures that will thereby experience little impact from the new law include:

  • sales jobs paying largely on a commission basis;
  • mid-level and higher positions in industries such as financial services for which the bulk of compensation is in the form of discretionary bonuses; and
  • positions at tech firms and other start-ups that offer stock option awards as a significant component of their overall compensation plan.

New York City’s new law also does not require disclosure of wage supplements, such as paid time off, or benefits, including insurance or pension plan contributions.  In this regard the law differs from its closest counterpart in Colorado, where employers are required to include in their job postings a general description of any bonuses and the nature of benefits provided.

The law further has its limitations – and the guidance is not particularly helpful – in regard to the wage range to be posted.  Where the pay is fixed, perhaps at or slightly above minimum wage, meeting this requirement is as simple as posting “$15 per hour.”  Where there is more flexibility or variability, depending on factors such as the candidate’s prior skills and experience or meeting the candidate’s stated salary expectations, New York City employers are directed to post a wage range based on the employer’s honest belief as of the time of the job posting as to the range of pay it would offer to a successful applicant.

States with similar wage transparency laws, most notably neighboring Connecticut, have defined benchmarks for employers to use in defining the wage range.  These may be an applicable pay scale, the amount budgeted for the position, or the actual range of wages for those employees currently holding comparable positions.  The New York City law, and this new guidance, are both silent on that point.  Nothing in the law or the guidance states that an employer cannot hire someone at a wage that is above or below the posted range, but there also is nothing in the law or guidance that assures an employer it can make those hiring decisions.

Employers that hire, transfer or promote candidates into roles at wage rates that fall outside the posted range must therefore be prepared to demonstrate the bona fides of their original wage range estimate, as reflected in the job posting.  These employers also should be prepared to explain why/how the wage they ultimately agreed to pay was not foreseeable at the time of the job posting.

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25

March, 2022

3 Handbook Policy Requirements that New York Employers May Overlook

By Tracey I. Levy and Alexandra Lapes

Spring cleaning is a great time for employers to revisit their employee handbook policies to confirm that they comply with current legal obligations.  In addition to updates prompted by new legislation, there are more long-standing, New York-specific requirements that we find employers may overlook.  These include specific provisions on accommodation of breastfeeding employees, protection of reproductive health decisions, and smoking prohibitions.

Policy on Lactation Accommodation

All New York State employers are required to make reasonable efforts to provide their employees with a designated room or other private, sanitary location that is not a bathroom, as well as reasonable unpaid break time, for the purposes of expressing breast milk.  New York City law requires that employers have a written policy regarding the rights of nursing mothers to express milk at work, which it distributes to all employees upon hire.  The New York State Division of Labor Standards has similarly issued guidelines that employers are expected to provide employees who are returning to work following the birth of a child with written notice, either individually or through a written handbook policy, regarding their right to break time and an appropriate location for expressing breast milk.

A declarative statement as to the availability of appropriate time and space to express breast milk, or of the employer’s support of its breast-feeding employees, may not be sufficient.  The New York City law specifies a plethora of provisions that must be in the written policy, including:

  • a statement of the employee’s right of access to an appropriate lactation room and reasonable break time to use it;
  • how to request access to the designated lactation room;
  • reference to the employer’s obligation to respond to access requests within a reasonable timeframe, not to exceed five business days;
  • a procedure to follow when two or more individuals need to use the room at the same time; and
  • assure employees that if the request poses an undue hardship, the employer will engage in a cooperative dialogue with the employee to provide a reasonable accommodation.

Reproductive Health Decisions Policy

All employers in New York State are prohibited from discrimination based on an employee’s or the employee’s dependent’s reproductive health decisions.  The law further requires that any New York employer that provides an employee handbook to its employees must include in the handbook a notice of employee rights and remedies under the law.  This includes notice that:

  • employers are prohibited from accessing an employee’s personal information regarding the employee’s or the employee’s dependent’s reproductive health decision making;
  • employers are prohibited from discriminating or retaliating against an employee based on the employee’s or dependent’s reproductive health decision making;
  • employers are prohibited from requiring an employee to sign a waiver of the employee’s right to make reproductive health decisions; and
  • employees have the right to bring a civil action against the employer for violation of the law and available remedies.

Some employers satisfy this obligation with a separate reproductive decisions policy.  Others may choose to incorporate the requisite provisions pertaining to reproductive health decisions into existing handbook policies that prohibit discrimination and retaliation and specify employees’ legal rights and available remedies under the laws against harassment, discrimination and retaliation.

Note: a March 29, 2022 federal district court decision, CompassCare et.al v. Cuomo, has permanently enjoined enforcement of the notice requirement with regard to reproductive health decisions, on the grounds that it violates the First Amendment.

Smoking Prohibitions in the Workplace

It has been several decades since New York State, New York City, and various counties adopted laws prohibiting smoking in the workplace and other public areas, such that those restrictions are no longer novel or surprising to most workers. This cultural shift may lead employers to overlook a long-standing requirement in many of the local laws, including from Westchester County and Suffolk County, that employers adopt and maintain written policies against smoking in the workplace. New York City’s law goes a bit further in its specificity.  The New York City law requires every employer to have and distribute to all new employees when hired a written policy outlining:

  • the legal prohibitions on smoking and the use of electronic cigarettes;
  • the protection from retaliation for employees or applicants who exercise their right to a smoke-free workplace; and
  • the employer’s procedure for an employee to raise concerns in the event of perceived retaliation.

Takeaways

The passage of time can dull any employer’s recollection of when handbook policies are simply memorializing employer expectations and practices, and when those policies are driven by legal requirements.  The latter must be maintained and updated as the law changes.  Now is a great time for employers to take stock of their handbook policies, and ensure they have the requisite provisions to comply with the law.

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20

March, 2022

COVID Mandates Have Lessened But Employers Still Have Obligations

By Alexandra Lapes and Tracey I. Levy

New York State employers may now suspend implementation of their infectious disease prevention plans (otherwise known as HERO Act plains), as the state’s order designating COVID-19 as a highly contagious communicable disease expired on March 17, 2022 and thus far has not been extended.  As COVID-related mandates have largely been lifted or expired across the tri-state, employers are once again left in a state of uncertainty – after two years of massive regulations, what is still required and where do employers have discretion to act independently in responding to the pandemic?  The short answer is that it varies, and we have endeavored to summarize the current state as of March 2022.

COVID-Related Restrictions and Current Effect

CDC Guidelines Applicable Throughout the County

The CDC continues to require individuals who are two and older to wear a face mask on public transportation and conveyances such as trains and airplane.  Outside that context, the CDC maintains its distinction between those who are and those who are not vaccinated, and recommends that unvaccinated people continue to wear a face mask at public events and gatherings around other people.

New York State and New York City

Masks are no longer mandatory in most settings

Effective as of February 10, 2022, Governor Hochul lifted the indoor mask-or-vaccine mandate for all private sector employers in New York State.  As a result, most employers now have discretion as to whether and when to require face coverings.  However, in addition to the CDC mandate for public transportation, masks are still required for certain high-density and particularly vulnerable settings, including all health care settings regulated by the Department of Health and other related state agencies, nursing homes, adult care facilities, correctional facilities, detention centers, homeless shelters, and domestic violence shelters, public transit and transportation hubs.

NYC customers need no longer prove vaccination status, but proof is still required for employees

New York City suspended the “Key to NYC” mandate as of March 7, 2022, that had required businesses to verify vaccination status as a condition of entry to indoor dining, fitness, and entertainment venues in the city.  However, through a new Mayoral Executive Order issued on March 4, 2022 and ongoing requirements by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), all employees who work in-person in New York City – for every type of employer – must provide or have provided proof of vaccination against COVID-19 to their employers.  Employers must exclude from the workplace any worker who has not provided such proof, unless an exception due to a religious or medical accommodation applies, or a worker only enters the workplace for a quick and limited purpose.

In addition to the vaccination requirement, New York City employers currently must continue to:

  • Post an official DOHMH sign in a conspicuous location at the business; and
  • Keep a record of each worker’s proof of vaccination (including ensuring employees get their second dose) and any reasonable accommodations.

Employers who previously posted a notice per the Key to NYC requirements do not need to post the DOHMH attestation sign.

New Jersey and Connecticut – Reprieve from Face Coverings

For New Jersey employers, as of March 7, 2022, the statewide mask mandate has been lifted, as the Governor signed an executive order withdrawing the declaration of COVID-19 as a public health emergency.

For most employers in Connecticut, all business sector rules enacted to prevent the spread of COVID-19 were lifted as of May 19, 2021, with limited exceptions where face coverings were still required.  Those exceptions are still in effect in accordance with the latest order issued by the Connecticut Public Health Commissioner effective February 28, 2022, and face masks are therefore still required in schools, healthcare settings, and shelters.

Ongoing COVID Leave Obligations

Employers in New York State, New York City, and New Jersey must be aware of continuing COVID leave obligations, particularly concerning paid sick leaves, that remain in effect.  We have broken down the key pieces of COVID-related leave provisions effective in the tri-state area below.

For more information regarding NY and NJ on-going pandemic-related paid leave provisions see this blog article, and the series of COVID-19 leave articles on our blog.

Stay Informed

The news is swirling with reports of new COVID-19 variants developing, some of which may trigger future restrictions.  Therefore it is prudent for employers to continue to monitor for further updates.  We have provided links below for current standards issued at the federal, state and local levels impacting employers in the New York tri-state area.

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13

March, 2022

New Fed Arbitration Ban Warrants Employers Redouble Measures to Prevent Workplace Harassment

By Tracey I. Levy

In the aftermath of #MeToo, state legislatures across the country adopted a range of new employment law protections, typically focused around four objectives:

  • advising employees of their legal rights and obligations and how to raise concerns;
  • expanding the scope and remedies under existing laws;
  • lifting the cloak of secrecy around sexual harassment and sexual assault allegations; and
  • ensuring employees can pursue legal claims in a public judicial forum.

A new federal law, which took effect March 3, 2002, addresses the fourth objective by prohibiting forced arbitration of sexual harassment and sexual assault claims.  The new federal law raises the stakes for employers and warrants revisiting existing measures to prevent incidents of offensive sexual conduct in the workplace.

Advising Employees of Their Legal Rights

New York woke up after #MeToo and has since been at the forefront of the effort to educate employees on the prevention of sexual harassment.  The state mandated both that employers adopt sexual harassment prevention policies that include an array of specific provisions, including a written complaint form, and that they conduct annual sexual harassment prevention training for all employees.  Other states, like California and Connecticut, which had existing harassment prevention training mandates for supervisors, imposed new training requirements applicable to all employees.  And some states imposed requirements only for particular industries.  For example, Illinois targeted restaurants and bars with a requirement to have a written sexual harassment prevention policy with specific provisions, while Washington state mandates sexual harassment prevention training for businesses that employ janitors, security guards, hotel housekeepers, or room service attendants.

Expanding Legal Remedies

New York also was one of the first states to respond by expanding the application of its law against sexual harassment – to every employer in the state, and by including independent contractors within its definition of “employees.”  The initially laws myopically applied only to claims of sexual harassment but were subsequently expanded to include all other protected characteristics.  New York also legislatively defined harassment more broadly than most – to cover any situation in which an employee is subject to “inferior terms, conditions or privileges of employment” based on a protected characteristic, without need to prove that the behavior was severe or pervasive.  Other states have made similar changes, including California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, and Vermont.

Lifting the Cloak of Secrecy

California, New Jersey, New York and Tennessee were among the states to adopt measures restricting employers from imposing nondisclosure or confidentiality requirements in the context of settlements of sexual harassment or sexual assault claims.  Illinois, Maryland and Vermont have gone a step further, by additionally mandating that employers periodically report certain data on sexual harassment complaints to a state government agency.  Congress similarly sought to limit nondisclosure agreements by amending the tax code in December 2017 to prohibit employers from claiming a deduction for any settlement payment or attorney’s fees related to sexual harassment or abuse if the settlement was subject to a nondisclosure agreement.

Preserving the Ability to Sue in Court

Most of the same states that invalidated nondisclosure or confidentiality requirements also declared invalid any pre-dispute arbitration clause applicable to a sexual harassment claim.  Those efforts have been stymied, however, because employers generally have been successful in arguing that the state laws are preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act.

Where the New Federal Law Fits In

The new federal law on arbitration of sexual harassment and sexual assault claims avoids the problem the states have faced because it falls outside the scope of the Federal Arbitration Act.  The law also is notably different in scope and import because it:

  • applies to all existing and future pre-dispute arbitration agreements throughout the country;
  • applies to all existing and future class action waiver clauses throughout the country; and
  • grants the party asserting a claim for sexual harassment or sexual assault (whether under federal, state or tribal law) the sole discretion to elect whether to proceed through arbitration or in court, and whether to pursue the claim as a class or collective action.

Senator Lindsey Graham, one of the bill’s sponsors, has been quoted as remarking that the new law will force corporate America to “up their game” and adopt new practices.

Employer Actions in a Higher Stakes Environment

Employers looking to decipher what that could mean should start with a two-fold assessment.  First, ensure that you are complying, in all your workplace locations, with the most recent state and local laws regarding harassment prevention.  In particular, confirm that your policies are current, your agreements are compliant, and that you are timely meeting all training requirements.

Second, consider the four objectives that have driven the state legislative responses.  What initiatives might you want to adopt in your workplace to enhance a culture of respect and ensure employees feel comfortable raising concerns?  Are you conducting harassment prevention training at periodic intervals?  Is your harassment prevention training program merely a check-the-compliance-box exercise, or has it been structured, scheduled and promoted to invite heightened awareness and genuine reflection?  Where still legally permissible, what are the upsides and downsides of maintaining confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements, and are they the best approach for your organization at this time of greater transparency?

No employer is immune from complaints of unlawful harassment.  But our experience has been that actions taken by employers to create and sustain a respectful workplace culture can substantially mitigate that risk and create a more productive workplace environment.

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17

January, 2022

NYC Pushes Emerging National Trend to Regulate AI in Hiring Decisions

By Alexandra Lapes and Tracey I. Levy

New York City is near the forefront of  an emerging trend of regulating an employer’s use of artificial intelligence in employment decisions.  Employers and HR professionals use AI to collect and scan large applicant pools for qualified candidates and to target job listings to potential applicants on websites like LinkedIn and Indeed.  Artificial intelligence tools make it possible for employers to expand their search for more qualified and diverse candidates, screen for candidates with the most advantageous skills, increase efficiency, and streamline their hiring process.

But concerns about the implications of the technology in potentially magnifying biased decision-making are leading legislative bodies to impose precautionary measures.  Illinois was the first to legislate in this area in 2019, and in 2021 there were 17 states that had proposed laws to regulate artificial intelligence.  Opponents of using artificial intelligence cite studies that tools to assess a candidates’ skills and adeptness, which are based on a predetermined set of criteria created by humans with their own implicit biases, have the potential to reproduce bias and create unfair decision-making on a much broader scale.

Further fueling the legislative trend, in October 2021, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) launched an initiative on artificial intelligence and algorithmic fairness to examine the issue of AI, people analytics, and big data in hiring and other employment decisions.  The EEOC will establish a working group to launch a series of listening sessions with key stakeholders and gather information on the impact of AI in employment decisions, to  examine more closely how technology changes the way employment decisions are made and to ensure those technologies are used fairly and consistently with federal equal employment opportunity laws.  The EEOC ultimately plans to  issue guidance for employers to ensure fairness in AI algorithms.  In addition, the Commission has implemented extensive training for its investigators in 2021 on the use of AI in employment practices.

New York City Is at the Forefront

New York City has stepped forward with the most stringent law in the country to date, which will require that by January 2, 2023, employers only use automated employment decision making tools that were independently audited for bias no more than one year prior to their use.  The law defines an automated employment decision tool as “any computerized process, derived from machine learning, statistical modeling, data analysis, or artificial intelligence, that issues simplified output, including a score, classification, or recommendation, which is used to substantially assist or replace discretionary decision making for making employment decisions that impact natural persons.”   The “bias audit” required means an impartial evaluation by an independent auditor and must include testing to assess the tool’s disparate impact on persons in any federal EEO Component 1 form category (currently race/ethnicity and sex).

The law also imposes various disclosure requirements:

  • Website Posting – Employers must post on their website the summary of the results of the most recent audit conducted and the tool’s distribution date; and
  • Notice of usage – Applicants and employees who reside in New York City must be given 10 business days’ advance notice that the tool is being used to assist in evaluation of that individual for an employment decision, and the job qualifications and characteristics the automated tool will be using to assess the person’s candidacy.

Finally, an applicant or employee is granted the right to request an alternative selection process or accommodation be used, instead of the automated tool.

Notably, if not already disclosed publicly on the employer’s website, information about the type of data collected for the automated employment decision tool, the source of that data, and the employer or employment agency’s data retention policy, must be made available to any candidate or employee within 30 days of a written request.   Each day that an employer uses an automated assessment tool that does not comply with the law is considered a separate violation, and each time an employer fails to provide the proper notice, is subject to a penalty that ranges from $500 to $1,500 per violation.

More Such Laws Are Likely Coming

California and Washington, D.C. currently have bills pending that target the use of artificial intelligence in employment.  If passed, the D.C. law would be similar to the New York City bill, and would go even further to require a covered entity that takes adverse action in whole or in part on the results of an algorithmic eligibility determination provide the individual with a notice of any information the entity used to make the determination, provide the individual the ability to submit corrections to that information, and if the individual submits corrections, additionally they may request the entity conduct a reasoned reevaluation of the relevant algorithmic eligibility determination, conducted by a human on the corrected data.

Illinois’s law differs from New York City’s approach in that it restricts the use of video interview technology in the hiring process.  Like New York City, Illinois requires employers who use restricted AI hiring tools to disclose and obtain consent from the candidate prior to use and to explain to the candidate how the AI works and what general types of characteristics it uses to evaluate applicants.   Maryland adopted still another approach in 2020, and it prohibits employers from using facial recognition technology during job interviews without the applicant’s consent.

Further Considerations

Details of what is required to comply with the New York City bias audit have yet to be determined, including whether a vendor’s confirmation of such an assessment is sufficient for the product’s use in any setting, or whether an independent audit will be required for each employer.  In either case, it is left to vendors and employers to absorb the cost of compliance.

In addition, for those that request an alternative selection process, the law does not address what type of accommodation is required or under what conditions, and it remains unclear whether employers must grant such requests.

Employers should continue to monitor for any additional guidance New York City publishes and review and revise their policies and practices to reflect the notices and disclosures required of the law.

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