11

April, 2021

Reconciling 2021’s Expanded NYS and FFCRA COVID-Related Leave Obligations

By Tracey I. Levy

The continuation of the payroll tax credits under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) through September 30, 2021, with an increased range of qualifying purposes, together with new guidance from the New York State Department of Labor on New York’s own COVID-19 leave requirements, can collectively leave employers in a quandary as to their legal options and obligations.  The following table overlays the requirements and eligibility criteria under the state and federal laws.  As referenced in the table:

NYS COVID-19 Leave – is leave for a period of up to two weeks based on a government-issued quarantine or isolation order. New York State mandates employers provide up to three periods of covered leave per employee, but the second and third periods must be for a quarantine based on the employee’s own condition and not merely as a precaution due to exposure to others who tested positive for COVID-19 (see our  NYS COVID leave blog posting).  New York State Short-Term Disability (STD) and Paid Family Leave (PFL) benefits are available simultaneously, with no waiting period, to employees of small and medium employers for the otherwise unpaid portion of a period of leave based on being personally subject to a government-issued quarantine or isolation order.

NYS Paid Family Leave benefit – provides payment to care for a child for the duration of a quarantine or isolation period, and for up to 12 weeks of leave per year at the statutory amount ($840.70/week) through the government-mandated NYS PFL program for care of a family member who is sick with COVID-19 where the family member’s sickness meets the PFL definition of a serious health condition.

FFCRA tax credit for sick leave – provides employers who offer paid COVID-19 leave with a tax credit for a total of two weeks, up to a cap of $511 per day for sick leave due to an employee’s own medical condition and a cap of $200 per day for sick leave due to care of someone else.  Employees who previously received FFCRA COVID-19 leave in the first year of the pandemic are eligible for up to another two weeks of leave as of April 1, 2021.  Note that FFCRA paid leave offered in 2021 is on a voluntary basis and is not mandated, but should be provided consistently to all eligible employees.

FFCRA tax credit for care of a family member – provides employers who offer paid COVID-19 family care leave with a tax credit up to a cap of $200 per day for a total of 12 weeks under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA); employees who previously received FFCRA COVID-19 family leave in the first year of the pandemic are eligible for up to another twelve weeks of leave beginning April 1, 2021.  Note that FFCRA paid leave offered in 2021 is on a voluntary basis and is not mandated, but should be provided consistently to all eligible employees.

April 2021 COVID Leave Table

 

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail
17

March, 2021

ARPA Offers Financial Relief for Employers Facing NYS’s Latest COVID-19 Vaccine/Sick Leave Mandates

By Tracey I. Levy

New York State employers face yet another payroll cost challenge as the state has now mandated, as of March 12, 2021, that employees be granted up to four hours of paid leave (separate from all existing paid time off benefits) for purposes of receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.  This is in addition to the state’s mandates for employers to provide up to three two-week intervals of COVID-19 sick leave, at least a portion of which must be paid by all but the smallest employers, as we have discussed in prior blog articles.

Fortunately, among the financial benefits included in the new American Rescue Plan Act (“ARPA”) are several provisions that are particularly helpful to New York State employers struggling to comply with the state’s unfunded COVID-19-related paid leave mandates.  While not mandatory, ARPA authorizes employers to claim a dollar-for-dollar tax credit for qualifying wages paid to employees for leave taken under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”).  ARPA expands the list of FFCRA-qualifying leaves, and it extends the FFCRA leave eligibility period.

Expansion of FFCRA Leave

The FFCRA was originally designed to provide employees with up to 10 days of paid sick leave for six qualifying reasons: (i) inability to work due to a government-issued quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19; (ii) inability to work due to quarantine or isolation on advice of a health care provider related to COVID-19; (iii) if the employee was experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and seeking a medical diagnosis; (iv) if an employee was caring for someone subject to quarantine for COVID-19; (v) to care for a child whose school or childcare center was closed for COVID-related reasons; and (vi) if an employee was experiencing substantially similar conditions as specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

ARPA expands that list to permit FFCRA paid sick leave for three additional reasons:

  • to take time off to get a vaccine;
  • to recover from illness or injury related to the vaccine; or
  • while awaiting the results of a COVID-19 test or diagnosis because the employer requested that the employee be tested or because the employee was exposed to someone who had tested positive for COVID-19.

The FFCRA originally offered an additional benefit of 12 weeks of Emergency FMLA leave (under the Emergency Family Medical Leave Expansion Act), which comprised two weeks of unpaid, and 10 weeks of paid, leave at two-thirds of the employee’s salary, up to $200 per day.  EFMLA leave was available, however, solely for reason “v” as listed above – to care for a child whose school or childcare center was closed for COVID-related reasons.  ARPA now expands eligibility for EFMLA leave to all nine of the qualifying reasons specified above.   ARPA also increases the paid component so that an employee can receive partial salary for all 12 weeks of the leave period.

Extension of FFCRA Leave

In addition to expanding the qualifying reasons for FFCRA leave, ARPA extends the period in which an employee can qualify for the leave through September 30, 2021.  ARPA also resets the clock on the 10-day cap on eligible COVID-related sick leave as of April 1, 2021, so that employees who have already taken FFCRA qualifying paid sick leave since the start of the pandemic can take up to 10 additional days of leave for a qualifying reason subsequent to April 1, 2021.Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

26

January, 2021

NYS Employers Required to Provide Multiple Rounds of COVID-19 Paid Sick Leave

By Tracey I. Levy

Employers in New York State may have to pay employees at full salary for more than six weeks of COVID-19 leave (in addition to all other paid leave benefits offered by the employer or mandated by law) under new guidance issued by the New York State Department of Labor (“NYS DOL”) on January 20, 2021.  This is precisely the position that we flagged as a troubling open issue in our prior blog posting, Extension of FFCRA Credit Helps NYS Employers.

The NYS DOL guidance provides that if an employee who returns to work following a period of quarantine or isolation subsequently tests positive for COVID-19, the employee must submit proof of the positive test result and is not allowed to come to work.  Rather, the employee is deemed to be subject to a new mandatory order of isolation and is entitled to New York State’s paid COVID-19 leave law, irrespective of whether the employee already received a full two weeks of paid COVID-19 leave for the prior quarantine.  Similarly, if an employee has been out on COVID-19 leave due to a quarantine or isolation order and continues to test positive for COVID-19 after the end of the quarantine or isolation period, the employee cannot come to work.  Instead, upon proof of the positive test result, the employee is entitled to an additional period of COVID-19 paid leave.

In addition, if an employer mandates that an employee who is not otherwise subject to a quarantine or isolation order remain out of work due to actual or potential exposure to COVID-19 (from any source), then the employer has to continue to pay the employee’s regular salary for so long as the employer requires the employee to stay away from work or until such time as the employee actually becomes subject to a mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine or isolation.  If and when the employee is subject to a quarantine/isolation order, the clock will then begin running on the mandatory New York COVID-19 sick leave period, but the period of paid leave preceding issuance of the order will not count as part of the two-week COVID-19-leave period.

The one concession to employers offered by the new guidance is that they need not endure more than three rounds of paying COVID-19 sick leave for a quarantined employee.  Also, while the first COVID-19 paid sick leave period may arise based on the employee being subject to a COVID-19-related quarantine or isolation order for any reason, the second and third rounds must be predicated on the employee personally testing positive for COVID-19.

Employers have limited options under this new guidance.  Some attorneys have suggested that the guidance (which does not have the same force as a regulation) is subject to challenge on the grounds that it exceeds the scope of the law.  Short of commencing litigation, employers can bear the cost of the more expansively-interpreted law and look to the FFCRA tax credit to offset the costs of each employee’s first round of New York State COVID-19 paid leave.  While the tax credit is set to expire March 31, 2021, it may be extended as part of the latest federal COVID-19 relief legislation.  Notably, New York State’s COVID-19 leave is not available if an employee is able to work remotely, so employers should maximize that opportunity whenever an employee is quarantined but either has not tested positive or is experiencing few symptoms and feels well enough to work.

One other option for employers that are really struggling financially at this time may be to suspend or temporarily reduce vacation or other paid time off benefits for the duration of the pandemic so as to offset the employers’ salary continuation obligations under the COVID-19 leave law.  In most non-union situations, New York State employers are able to modify their paid time off policies at any time, provided employees continue to receive the leave time to which they are entitled by law.  Vacation and extended PTO days fall outside those statutory requirements, and employers generally have flexibility to modify those policies.  It is advisable, though, to consider the  resulting impact to employee morale, and to consult legal counsel before making any such modifications in this context.Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

30

December, 2020

Extension of FFCRA Credit Helps NYS Employers

By Tracey I. Levy

As a post-script to our last blog post, the latest federal COVID-19 relief package, which was signed into law on December 27, 2020, includes a short-term extension of the FFCRA tax credit that offers some additional financial relief for New York State employers.  As we previously discussed, the paid leave requirements of the FFCRA are set to expire December 31, 2020, and the new COVID-19 relief package allows those requirements to sunset.  However, those employers that voluntarily elect to continue to provide the paid leave that was available under the FFCRA, under that law’s eligibility requirements, can continue to claim a federal payroll tax credit through March 31, 2021 to offset the cost of that leave.  New York employers do not have an option with regard to providing COVID-19 leave, and therefore the extension of the FFCRA credit may be a valuable benefit to manage the associated costs.

There are some notable limitations on which employers can benefit from the federal tax credit:

  • Large Employers

Employers with more than 500 employees are subject to the New York State paid leave requirements, but were not subject to the FFCRA paid leave requirement and therefore cannot claim the credit;

  • Multiple Quarantines for the Same Employee

To the extent the reasons for leave under the FFCRA and New York State law have overlapped, the FFCRA tax credit was limited to a total of ten days of paid leave, per employee.  However, the New York State law does not appear to place a limit on the number of times an employee can receive paid leave, provided each leave is in accordance with a government-mandated quarantine or isolation order.  Once an employer has claimed the FFCRA tax credit for an employee, it appears that it cannot be claimed again for a repeat occurrence of quarantine.

New York State employers should consult with their tax advisor with regard to the availability of the tax credit in specific circumstances.Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

17

December, 2020

FFCRA Is Ending, But NYS Employers Still Have COVID-Leave Obligations

By Tracey I. Levy

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”), which provides up to two weeks of paid, job-protected sick leave to covered employees for a variety of COVID-related reasons, and additional leave for care of a child related to COVID, is scheduled to sunset on December 31, 2020. Presently, there seems to be limited legislative or executive effort to extend the law beyond that date, even as we remain in the throes of the pandemic. That means that, as of January 1, 2021, employees will no longer be eligible for FFCRA leave, any employee who is on leave as of December 31, 2020 will be ineligible for continued leave after that date, and employers who continue to grant employees leave for an FFCRA-qualifying reason will not be entitled to claim tax credits for paid COVID leave days subsequent to December 31. In a nutshell, the sunset clause means an end to any federal paid leave benefit or tax credit, and restoration to the way things were back in March 2020, before the pandemic.

While those consequences are relatively simple to explain, the interplay with New York State law makes things a bit more complicated. New York State passed its own COVID-related leave law, which took effect on the same day as the FFCRA. New York State’s law grants all employees COVID-related leave if an employee is personally subject to a mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine or isolation due to COVID-19, provided the employee is not physically able to work remotely while under quarantine. Employees are disqualified from the NYS COVID-related leave benefit only if they are being quarantined for having traveled outside the U.S., for non-work-mandated reasons, to a country for which the employee was on advance notice of a level two or level three travel notice having been issued by the CDC. New York State’s COVID-related leave law has no sunset date; rather, the leave benefit is specifically tied to COVID-19 and therefore, for as long as employees are subject to COVID-related quarantine or isolation orders, they remain eligible for the benefits provided under the state’s law.

As we noted previously in the Summer 2020 issue of our newsletter, Takeaways, employees who are directed by a healthcare provider to quarantine or isolate can obtain a quarantine or isolation order by following a process jointly defined by the New York State Departments of Health and Labor to request such an order from their local health department. New York City had issued a standing order with various appendices that, when satisfied, would be deemed to meet the state law quarantine order requirement, but the city has since withdrawn that page from its website.

For those employees who meet the NYS eligibility criteria, employers must provide the following, depending on their profitability and the size of their workforce:

  • 14 calendar days of job-protected, paid COVID-related leave, at the employee’s regular rate of pay, if the employer has 100 or more employees;
  • 5 calendar days of job-protected, paid COVID-related leave, at the employee’s regular rate of pay, and an additional 9 calendar days of job-protected, unpaid leave, if the employer has 11 to 99 employees or has fewer employees but had a net profit of $1,000,000 or more last year; and
  • 14 calendar days of job-protected, unpaid COVID-related leave, for all other employers with 10 or fewer employees.

Employees are entitled to apply for New York State Short-Term Disability and Paid Family Leave benefits, simultaneously and without any waiting period, during the unpaid portion of their quarantine leave, and all COVID-related leave is in addition to, and gets used before, any paid time off the employee may have otherwise available under the employer’s paid leave policies or the new New York State paid sick leave law.  New York State provides no reimbursement or subsidy to employers for the paid sick leave benefits required under the law.

As a reminder, FFCRA also provided employees with partially-paid leave benefits, of varying duration, in the event they were caring for a child or family member who was quarantined due to COVID. New York State law has no similar provision. However, to the extent an employee meets the eligibility criteria for Paid Family Leave (having worked at least 20 hours per week for 26 consecutive weeks), if either (i) the employee’s child has been quarantined and the employee is unable to work remotely while caring for that child, or (ii) the employee is unable to work because the employee needs to care for a close family member who contracts COVID-19, the employee can submit a claim for job-protected Paid Family Leave and receive paid time off benefits under that program.

New York State employers must therefore continue to provide COVID-related paid sick leave benefits to their employees, where the eligibility criteria are met, and shoulder those benefit costs, for as long as we are facing COVID-19-related quarantine orders.Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Back to Top